Lower Galilee / Periods: Roman, Byzantine, Arabic.

Just four kilometers from Nazareth is the antiquated town of Zippori. It was the intellectual and administrative capital of Galilee, it was known as the “city of peace.” Zippori has delightful mosaics and has been portrayed as ornament of the whole of Galilee,” by Josephus Flavius, a Jewish history specialist. The Tsippori National Park lies in the western Lower Galilee, in the region of the limestone hills between Nahal Tsippori to the south and the Bet Netofa Valley to the north. This place of pilgrimage was filmed for you in Virtual Reality 360°.

History

Tsippori was the magnificent capital of the Galilee already in the time of the Roman conquest, in 65 BC.  In the 2nd century CE Rabbi Yehuda Hanassi transferred the Sanhedrin to Tsippori, where the Mishna was completed. According to their tradition the Christians also attribute importance to the city because, this is where the parents of Mary, mother of Jesus, lived.

According to Josephus, Tsippori was also called the “glory of the entire Galilee”. The population of the city was mixed, and it was a Jewish’s center of the spirituality. Many scholars lived here, Rabbi Yehuda Hanassi transferred the seat of the Sanhedrin from Bet She’arim to Tsippori, and around 220 CE he completed the Mishna in the city. In the middle of the 3rd century, after the seat of the Sanhedrin was transferred to Tiberias, Tsippori lost its status as capital of the Galilee, but it apparently continued to be an important Jewish center until the 5th century CE, when the Christian community in the city increased and became a significant component of the population. The Christians attribute great importance to Tsippori due to their tradition that in this city lived Anne and Joachim, the parents of Mary, Jesus’ mother.  The fact that the city was a Christian center is evidenced by the remains of the Byzantine-Crusader church.  In the Arabian period the city fell from its greatness and in the Crusader period ” Sephori” was a city and fortress in the Galilean Principality.

Tsippori was the glorious capital of the Galilee as of now in the season of the Roman success, in 65 BC. In the second century CE Rabbi Yehuda Hanassi exchanged the Sanhedrin to Tsippori, where the Mishna was finished. As per their custom the Christians additionally credit significance to the city since, this is the place the parents of Mary, mother of Jesus, lived.

As indicated by Josephus, Tsippori was additionally called the “wonderfulness of the whole Galilee”. The number of inhabitants in the city was blended, and it was a Jewish’s focal point of the spirituality. Numerous researchers lived here, Rabbi Yehuda Hanassi transferred the seat of the Sanhedrin from Bet She’arim to Tsippori, and around 220 CE he finished the Mishna in the city. Amidst the third century, after the seat of the Sanhedrin was transferred to Tiberias, Tsippori lost its status as capital of the Galilee, however it evidently kept on being a critical Jewish focus until the fifth century CE, when the Christian people group in the city expanded and turned into a noteworthy part of the populace.

The Christians ascribe awesome significance to Tsippori because of their custom that in this city lived Anne and Joachim, the guardians of Mary, Jesus’ mom. The way that the city was a Christian focus is confirmed by the remaining parts of the Byzantine-Crusader church. In the Arabian time frame the city tumbled from its enormity and in the Crusader period “La Sephorie” was a city and post in the Galilean Principality.

We have several interesting points : 

(1) A reconstructed remnant of a Roman theater, unique in the country, built at the end of the first century CE.

(2) A Jewish Quarter, they are a remains of a Jewish residential quarter from the time of the Mishna.

(3) A Crusader castle, He was built in the Crusader period on top of the remains of an earlier structure, and from here the Crusader force departed for the battle at Hittin in 1187. The castle contains an exhibit of findings and tablets telling the history of the city and the excavations. There is a guided lookout on the roof.

(4) A Roman villa Dionysus House, containing a mosaic floor describing scenes from the life of Dionysus, god of wine in Greek mythology.  This impressive mosaic shows the image of a woman, nicknamed “the Mona Lisa of the Galilee”.  In the opinion of many researchers, it is the pinnacle of mosaic art in the country.

(5) The Nile Festival House: a public area from the Byzantine period, decorated with 11 mosaic floors describing the celebrations held in honor of the Nile’s rise to its highest level.

(6) The ancient reservoir, an impressive, 260 m. long underground water facility, which was in operation from the Roman period up to the 7th century. Walking inside the reservoir, deep below surface level, is a unique experience. Close to the reservoir is the 6-shaft tunnel.

(7) A synagogue, dated to the end of the Byzantine period, containing an impressive mosaic floor divided into four parts:  the Sacrifice of Isaac, the signs of the Zodiac, a description of the Tabernacle in the desert and the Arc of the Covenant in the Jerusalem Temple.

(8) Layout of the streets: the remains of the intersection between the Cardo and the Decumanus were exposed on the site. These streets formed part of the city market.

Discover this place in Virtual Reality 360° by clicking on the image below.

360 degree video

Panoramic Photography in 360 degree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images gallery from Sepphoris (Zippori National Park)

Map

Sepphoris (Zippori National Park)

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